Althea McNish: The color is mine

After leaving Trinidad for the UK in 1950, McNish achieved international recognition for her innovative and brilliantly colored textiles. His first museum survey, at the William Morris Gallery in London (April 2 to June 26), considers the artist’s legacy both as a commercial designer and as a key player in the Caribbean art movement of the 1960s. 1960s and 1970s, and makes it clear that in all facets of her work, McNish was a committed experimenter. At the heart of the exhibition is its green setting golden harvest (1957); Perhaps the artist’s most recognizable print, it was his first commercial design for Hull Traders and is inspired by McNish’s first encounter with an English wheat field, which evoked memories of his childhood of sugar cane plantations in Trinidad. McNish would go on to create many familiar collections of fabrics and wallpapers for major companies of the day and collaborate frequently with artists including Henry Moore. Also on display are items from the artist’s personal archive, including excerpts from his university thesis and photographs from his years of study at the London School of Printing and Graphic Design. Find out more on the William Morris Gallery website.

Preview below | View Apollo’s Art Diary here

Althea McNish pictured in her studio (vs. 1970s), courtesy of N15 Archives. Photo: Bill Patterson

Golden Harvest (circa 1960s), Photo: Private Collection

golden harvest (vs. 1960s). Photo: Private collection

Textile design (circa 1950s-1960s).  Courtesy of N15 Archives: The Althea McNish Collection

textile design Textile design (vs.1950 – 60). Courtesy of N15 Archives: The Althea McNish Collection

Unidentified design.  Courtesy of N15 Archives: The Althea McNish Collection

Unidentified design Courtesy of N15 Archives: The Althea McNish Collection

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