CT artist Marcus Escribano will be featured in “Vanity Fair”

Enter Marcus Escribano’s art studio in Danbury, and the first thing visible is a whiteboard with random numbers. The smell of oil paint and an array of portraits fill every corner of his studio based at Western Connecticut State University.

Escribano, 27, is an award-winning African-Latin American artist based in Danbury. But during his first two years at WCSU, Escribano said he was lost and had no motivation because he had no idea what he wanted to do with his life. He then took a year and a half off, during which he discovered photography. He now takes his love for photography and turns it into a different art form – painting.

“One day I grabbed a camera and fell in love with photography,” he said. “I found myself turning my photography into paintings and began to focus on the European Renaissance genre of art.”

Painting by Marcus “Mesco” Escribano.


Jailene Cuevas / Hearst Connecticut Media

“Self-Portrait” by Marcus “Mesco” Escribano.


Jailene Cuevas / Hearst Connecticut Media

Some of Marcus “Mesco” Escribano’s pieces in his art studio at WCSU. Jailene Cuevas / Hearst CT Media Group

After teaching himself his passion, he decided to study fine art majoring in photography at Western Connecticut State University where he earned his Bachelor of Fine Arts. He also studied in Italy for a program called The Rome Art Program, in which students develop their artistic vision through painting and drawing on the streets of Rome. This summer he is going back, but this time he will return as a teacher.

“I still can’t believe I took this program as a student and now I’m going to teach students,” Escribano said.


His work has been exhibited in the United States, Italy, Greece and Hungary, according to Escribano. It was even featured twice in British Vogue last March and April and will be featured in the June issue of Vanity Fair UK’s monthly advertising art edition, which has yet to be published.

British Vogue’s March 2022 issue features model Naomi Cambell on the cover. Escribano appears in their “Vogue Gallery” section, which features artists from around the world. He is one of 57 artists featured and, according to the magazine, “Escribano’s work speaks louder than words”.

Escribano said that when Vogue contacted him to ask if he wanted to be part of the gallery section, he couldn’t refuse. “The day I got an email from Vogue, I had to take a couple of times like, ‘Vogue wants to include me in an issue?’ he said. “There are times where I still look at the emails because it still feels surreal.”

He sold his first large-scale piece named “Gaia” on April 5 to a hair salon called Pelo by Edgardo in Ridgefield. “It was just such a good feeling and the painting is here in my home country, it’s even better,” he said. He also won awards in 2017, such as the Allard Prize and the Monochrome Prize.

Drawing inspiration from artists like Pablo Picasso and Diego Velasquez, Escribano’s work explores the relationship between contemporary photography and fine art photography. Some of Escribrano’s paintings are nameless because the meaning changes as the way he views them changes.

“The name is constantly changing until I decide this will be it,” he said.

Some of Escribrano’s paintings don’t have a name because the meaning changes and “the way I see them changes so the name is constantly changing until I decide this will be it,” he said. .

Escribano’s works are done on canvas and wood using oil paint, a medium he has said he prefers.

“I prefer oil to acrylic and other paints because I can tune in and speak the same ‘language’ as the master painters who inspire me,” he said. “When you see my art, it’s very abstract like Picasso. I don’t come in with an idea; I just let the brush take me where it wants to go and then there’s a story.”

“Genesis” by Marcus “Mesco” Escribano using wood.

Jailene Cuevas / Hearst Connecticut Media

In his work, Escribano said he tries to reflect on his favorite numbers – 12, three and four – and incorporate them into his life, photography, digital painting and traditional paintings.

“When you add three and four it equals 12 and the number 12 is everywhere,” he said.

“So there are 12 months in a year, 12 signs of the zodiac, 12 disciples, 12 numbers in a jury, 12 ribs in a human, 12 spiritual doors, the 12th tarot card ‘The Hanged Man’, shows the sacrifice and the mediation and even 12 on the counter,” he said. “12 in many cultures signifies completeness.”

Mark

Marcus “Mesco” Escribano’s chart in his art studio explains his ideas about his favorite numbers, three, four and 12.


Jailene Cuevas / Hearst Connecticut Media
Mark

Marcus “Mesco” Escribano’s chart in his art studio explains his ideas about his favorite numbers, three, four and 12.


Jailene Cuevas / Hearst Connecticut Media
Mark

Marcus “Mesco” Escribano’s chart in his art studio explains his ideas about his favorite numbers, three, four and 12.


Jailene Cuevas / Hearst Connecticut Media


Marcus “Mesco” Escribano’s painting in his art studio explaining his ideas about his favorite numbers, three, four and 12.Jailene Cuevas/Hearst CT Media Group

He also said that number three is very powerful and “everything comes in threes”.

“Birth, love, death; Beginning, middle, end; Past present, future; and father, son and holy spirit, the three trifecta.”

There are also four elements (fire, air, water and earth) and four corners of the earth, according to Escribano, and when four is combined with three he said, “You get the perfect number 12.”

“It may not make sense to anyone but me,” Escribano said. “My way of thinking and driving is like Kanye West or at least inspired by him, where I stay disciplined in my craft because I believe I can do anything.”

As Escribano draws worldwide attention, he has said he will keep his talents at Danbury – at least for now.

“I don’t plan on leaving Danbury anytime soon, but my goal is to move somewhere in Europe and explore the world,” he said.

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